NSW Recorded Crime Statistics 2010                

 

Click here for the full report (pdf, 1Mb)

Release date: Tuesday, 19 April 2011, Embargo: 10.30am

State-wide changes (major offence groups)

The broad picture among the 17 major offence categories is largely one of stable or falling crime. In the
24 months to December 2010, ten of the 17 major offences were stable and seven were trending downwards. No major offences were trending upwards across the State. The offences trending downwards were:

  • Robbery without a weapon (down 6.9%),
  • Robbery with a weapon not a firearm (down 11.0%),
  • Break and enter non-dwelling (down 11.4%),
  • Motor vehicle theft (down 9.3%),
  • Steal from motor vehicle (down 4.8%),
  • Steal from person (down 10.6%) and
  • Malicious damage to property (down 10.1%).

The downward trend in assault on licensed premises reported in the last two quarters has dropped back to stable across all licensed premises, but continued for clubs (down 16.9%) and nightclub/licensed restaurant/winebar (down 16.8%).

Regional changes

Eight Statistical Divisions (SDs) nevertheless showed upward trends in at least one offence. They were as follows:

  • Illawarra SD: Break and enter non-dwelling (up 15.8%)
  • Mid-North Coast SD: Steal from retail store (up 27.3%)
  • Northern SD: Break and enter dwelling (up 19.2%)
  • North Western SD: Steal from motor vehicle (up 2.2%) and steal from retail store (up 13.7%)
  • Central West SD: Steal from motor vehicle (up 32.6%) and fraud (up 40.4%)
  • South Eastern SD: Steal from retail store (up 33.3%)
  • Murrumbidgee SD: Steal from motor vehicle (up 10.3%) and steal from retail store (up 12.2%)
  • Far West SD: Fraud (up 42.2%)


The increase in steal from retail store is being driven to a large extent by thefts of clothing, food and beverages (particularly alcohol). The increase in fraud and steal from motor vehicle in the Central West SD are associated with petrol theft and number plate theft.

Two metropolitan statistical subdivisions (SSDs) showed upward trends. They were:

  • Canterbury-Bankstown SSD: Domestic violence related assault (up 8.2%)
  • Blacktown SSD: Steal from motor vehicle (up 11.9%) and steal from dwelling (up 14.6%)


The best performing LGAs were Sydney, with downward trends for six of the 17 major offences, and
Ku-ring-gai, with downward trends for five of the 17 major offences. Eight LGAs had upward trends for two of the 17 major offences. They were:

  • Blacktown LGA: Steal from motor vehicle and steal from dwelling
  • Griffith LGA: Break and enter dwelling and steal from motor vehicle
  • Gunnedah LGA: Steal from motor vehicle and malicious damage to property
  • Lachlan LGA: Break and enter dwelling and break and enter non-dwelling
  • Maitland LGA: Break and enter dwelling and steal from retail store
  • Port Macquarie-Hastings LGA: Break and enter dwelling and steal from retail store
  • Wellington LGA: Break and enter dwelling and steal frommotor vehicle
  • Wollongong LGA: Break and enter dwelling and break and enter non-dwelling


Among the expanded list of 62 offences for the 24 months to December 2010, 12 showed an upward trend. They were as follows:

  • Possession and/or use of cocaine (up 23.3%),
  • Possession and/or use of cannabis (up 36.9%),
  • Possession and/or use of amphetamines (up 54.5%),
  • Possession and/or use of other drugs (up 42.3%),
  • Dealing, trafficking in cannabis (up 33.4%),
  • Dealing, trafficking in amphetamines (up 63.2%),
  • Dealing, trafficking in other drugs (up 50.6%),
  • Other drug offences (up 12.2%),
  • Prostitution offences (up 56.3%),
  • Breach bail conditions (up 7.4%),
  • Fail to appear (up 20.1%) and
  • Transport regulatory offences (up 26.5%).


Most of these offences are discovered by police rather than reported to them. The increases may therefore reflect increased law enforcement activity rather than increased crime. The exceptions are cocaine and amphetamine use, which other data suggests is increasing.

Commenting on the overall trends, the Director of the Bureau, Dr Don Weatherburn, said that they reflected the general pattern of stable or falling crime rates that has been evident across Australia since 2001.

Further enquiries: Dr Don Weatherburn 9231-9190 or 0419-494-408
Copies of the report: www.bocsar.nsw.gov.au

Viewrepo

rts in pdf

  • pdf - 1.1Mb)
  • An update of long-term trends in property and violent crime in New South Wales: 1990-2010 ( pdf - 874Kb)
  • Trends in assaults after midnight in - (pdf - 1.8Mb)