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CJB69

Author Garth Luke and Bronwyn Lind
Published April 2002
Report Type Crime and Justice Bulletin No. 69
Subject Court processes and delay; Diversion; Offenders; Sentencing; Evaluation reports
Keywords Young Offenders Act, conferencing, restorative justice, young offenders, court

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Summary

Aim

This study compares reoffending by young people who participated in a conference with reoffending by young people who attended court.

Abstract

With the commencement of the Young Offenders Act in April 1998, Youth Justice Conferencing was introduced across NSW as an alternative to a court appearance for young offenders. At a conference the young offender(s), family, victims and other supporters discuss the offending and its impact in order to encourage acceptance of responsibility by the offender, provide some form of restitution and help to reintegrate the offender back into his/her family and community. This study compares reoffending by young people who participated in a conference with reoffending by young people who attended court. The results indicate that conferencing produces a moderate reduction of up to 15 to 20 per cent in reoffending across different offence types and regardless of the gender, criminal history, age and Aboriginality of the offenders.