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cjb87.pdfcjb87 
 AuthorCraig Jones, Neil Donnelly, Wendy Swift and Don Weatherburn 
 PublishedSeptember 2005 
 Report typeCrime and Justice Bulletin No. 87 
 SubjectDriving offences, Drugs and Drug Courts 
 Keywordscannabis, drug-drivers, DUIC 
  
 

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Summary

Aim

Aim
This bulletin assessed (a) whether recent drug-drivers were more likely to self-report accidents than non-intoxicated drivers; (b) the likely deterrent effect of roadside drug testing (RDT), increasing the severity of sanctions for drug-driving and providing factual information about accident risk associated with drug-driving; and (c) what factors were predictive of driving under the influence of cannabis (DUIC).

Abstract

Abstract
This bulletin assessed:

(a) whether recent drug-drivers were more likely to self-report accidents than non-intoxicated drivers;
(b) the likely deterrent effect of roadside drug testing (RDT), increasing the severity of sanctions for drug-driving and providing factual information about accident risk associated with drug-driving; and
(c) what factors were predictive of driving under the influence of cannabis (DUIC). Face-to-face structured interviews were conducted with 320 cannabis users in NSW.

The results provided only limited support for a relationship between DUIC and accident risk, although replication with a larger sample size is recommended. RDT appears to act as a more effective deterrent against drug-driving than either increasing the severity of sanctions or providing factual information about the risks associated with the behaviour. Males, dependent users, early onset cannabis users, frequent drivers, cannabis users who had used more classes of other drugs and cannabis users who believed that their risk of accident would not change following cannabis use were all more likely to report DUIC.